News Briefs

Golden Gate Bridge toll plaza to be replaced

The Highway and Transportation District is planning to remove the toll plaza from the Golden Gate Bridge.

The district plans to get rid of the booths and build a “gantry” by 2018 for collecting tolls. The gantry would cost between $4-5 million, according to the SF Examiner.

The decision occurred after the eighty-fourth crash into the toll plaza. The electronic plaza, built in March 2013, consists of 11 lanes categorized by carpool and wide lanes

Automobiles are instructed to keep moving and pay later. The wide lanes are 11 feet and 10 inches wide, while the other lanes are nine feet and two inches wide. The height limit is 14 feet and six inches.

The cause of the crashes have typically been drivers with wider vehicles trying to squeeze their way through the smaller lanes, leaving them temporarily stuck between the toll lanes.

Damages of the impacts cost between $7,000 and $10,000 to repair, even when the plaza has protection with these circumstances. There is no set date to tear it down. 

– Cassie Ordonio


Ethnic studies curriculum in development for California high schools

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed new legislation Tuesday to develop a model curriculum for ethnic studies in high schools, according to the Office of the Governor.

Bill AB-2016, requires the California Instructional Quality Commission to develop – and California’s State Board of Education to adopt – a model curriculum in ethnic studies.

This curriculum will be developed with ethnic studies faculty from California universities and public school teachers with experience teaching ethnic studies.

AB-2016 also encourages public school districts and charter schools with grades nine to 12 to offer an ethnic studies course based upon the model curriculum.

The curriculum is expected to be completed by June 30, 2019, and adopted by Nov. 30, 2019.

-Dakari Thomas

Jane Kim speaks during a press conference on the steps of San Francisco City Hall. Free City Proposal will remove the tuition fee at City College of San Francisco for San Francisco residents. It will also grant $1000 per year for students who already receive federal and/or state assistance. San Francisco, California, September 14, 2016. (Photo by: Izar Decleto/The Guardsman)
Jane Kim speaks during a press conference on the steps of San Francisco City Hall. Free City Proposal will remove the tuition fee at City College of San Francisco for San Francisco residents. It will also grant $1000 per year for students who already receive federal and/or state assistance. San Francisco, California, September 14, 2016. (Photo by Izar Decleto/The Guardsman)

 

Free City initiative takes necessary next steps

Supervisor Jane Kim’s Free City initiative continues to take the necessary steps to become a reality in the near future. A rally was held on Wednesday, Sept. 14 in support of Prop W, the proposed real estate transfer tax that would fund tuition waivers at the college.  

“It is asking those in our community that make the most to pay their equitable fair share towards actually investing into the future of our city.” said Sunny Angulo, aide to Supervisor Aaron Peskin, at the rally, which was held before the Budget and Finance Committee meeting.

“We are going to make San Francisco the first city in the nation to make City College free for all our residents regardless of income, age, or GPA or pre-GPA requirement,“ Kim said.

Prop W proposes a .25 percent increase on the sale or transfer of property valued at $5 million dollars or higher. Revenue from the tax is estimated to range between $10 to $73 million, with an average of $45 million annually. It was determined in the meeting that City College would share this revenue with other city services.

The measure allocates reserve funding to support Free City during years when the tax draws in less revenue. Prop W also contains a provision to establish an oversight committee to ensure appropriate distribution of funds.

The measure would also provide up to $1,000 dollars to cover books and transportation costs.

“This is about students. This is about making education accessible and it’s also about turning something back to something that we think is the right way to go and that is to make sure anybody who wants an education can get it,“ AFT 2121 member Alissa Messer said. 

-Abdul-Latif Islam


Rams soccer updates

The Rams men’s soccer team sits at .500 as they are now on a two game losing streak, dropping their last game at Santa Rosa 2-0. The Rams have been held scoreless in those two losses with their last goal coming from their 2nd leading scorer, Cristian Carranza, against Mendocino College. Their next game is Tuesday, Sept. 27th at Las Positas College.

The Rams women’s soccer team has started off the season strong, only allowing 2 goals in their first 5 games. That defensive showing has put them at a 3-1-1 record, though their last two contests ended in a loss and a draw, respectively. Jesse Bareilles has been dominant for the Rams as her nine goals are tied for the most among California Community Colleges. Their next game is at home on Friday, Sept. 23rd against Foothill College.

– Dakari Thomas