Opinion: Getting Ahead in the Summer Time

BY MARIA UMANZOR

EDITOR

California’s education system is facing tough budget cuts, so while we wait for the fall semester, let’s focus on how wisely we can spend the summer time.

There’s only one week of class left before finals week starts. Despite the high pressure of doing well, many students wonder what they will do over two months.

Many students work full-time and earn extra money during summer. It’s the best time to get rid of stress that taking classes and working at the same time creates. Students can get on-campus jobs as work study and lab aides through City College’s job listing Web site www.ccsf.edu/jobs. Students should look for summer jobs and save money.

On the other hand, it’s recommended for students to take summer session classes. Budget cuts threaten to reduce lecture classes and some changes happened at City College.

According to Chancellor Don Griffin, of the 450 non-credit summer section offered this summer, 400 classes will be available in June and 50-60 in July. Non-credit ESL business application and transitional studies classes will be moved. However, if budget cut problems continue, “Summer 09 credit and non-credit session will be reduced drastically,” he said. Fortunately, there won’t be cuts on classes for the fall 08 semester. But still it’s important to take advantage of what’s available.

If you’re transferring next semester, use summer to get prepared for that transferring process. Whether you transfer to a four-year college within San Francisco, out of town or out of state, it’s always good to pull things together. Imagine finding out at the last minute that you forgot to send your transcripts, missed something in the application or didn’t declare your intent to register. Not good. Make sure you’re on the right track.

Internships give experience and will enrich your educational experience, plus it’s an excellent vehicle to accept or reject your major. When you pick major-related internships, you’re basically putting in practice what you learn in the classroom.

Getting ahead doesn’t harm anyone and even the little details are worth much more when it comes to your education, especially in difficult economic times.